Developments in technology have changed a lot of things. Thanks to smartphones we can now order pizza, check our bank balance and keep in touch with our friends all at the same time, but this much advancement comes at a price.

Via giphy.com
Via giphy.com

Middle Eastern artist Saint Hoax (that’s a pseudonym, and if you take a look at more of his controversial artwork you’ll see why he needs one) has taken note of the downsides of modern technology in his new Disney-inspired project Contemporary Fairy Tale. In this illustrated series, he depicts three famous Disney couples in their usual fairy tale settings, except instead of the long looks of love we’re accustomed to in Disney classics, the characters are staring at their phones – and the results are a lot less magical.

Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax

Social media has been around for over a decade now, but it was a recent event that influenced Hoax to create this arresting imagery: “What pushed all my buttons was when I witnessed two people who seemed to be on a date, barely have four full sentences with each other. At first, this was common among younger generations, but now my mother can’t even go through one conversation without checking her phone at least twice.”

Untitled
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax

He’s got a point.

Although Hoax admits he also checks his phone far too much, he insists he makes the effort to put it aside when engaging with others. His project isn’t trying to say technology is bad, but rather highlight the ways it is being misused. “Communication is a very important factor that directly affects societal development,” he said.

Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax

This isn’t the first time Hoax has used Disney characters to call attention to serious societal issues. His project Furry Tale focused on the horrors of the fur industry, by portraying Disney’s much loved animated animals stripped of their fur (warning, it’s pretty gruesome).

Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax

He has also previously used Disney princes and princesses to draw awareness to social problems, such as domestic violence and body image issues. In Happy Never After, his target audience is girls and woman who have been the target of domestic abuse, in the hopes they will feel encouraged to ask for help. Characters featured in the posters include Ariel, Jasmine, Cinderella and Aurora, and come with the tagline “When did he stop treating you like a princess?”

Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax

In Royal Misfits, Hoax hopes to reach youngsters dealing with eating disorders. On his website, the artists states that children as young as five are being diagnosed with Anorexia Nervosa, and he hopes that by depicting Disney characters as sufferers he is speaking to these children directly.

Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax
Via Instagram/Saint Hoax

For more of Hoax’s ‘POPlitically incorrect’ artwork, follow him on Instagram.